The People We Hate at the Wedding

The People We Hate at the Wedding

Book - 2017
Average Rating:
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Baker & Taylor
A fractured family from the Chicago suburbs reluctantly gathers in London to attend an eldest daughter's wedding to an upper-crust Englishman, an affair that exposes secrets, triggers riotous culture clashes and tests the bonds of both families. By the author of Driver's Education.

McMillan Palgrave

"It’s for the same audience that flocked to The Nest, Where’d You Go, Bernadette? or dare I say a little book you might be a fan of, Crazy Rich Asians."
Kevin Kwan, New York Times bestselling author of Crazy Rich Asians

"Sinfully good."
— Elin Hilderbrand

Entertainment Weekly's Summer Must-Read

A Publishers Weekly BEST SUMMER BOOKS, 2017

New York Post Best Books of Summer

Redbook's 10 Books You Have To Read This Summer

"The summer’s most compelling fictional exploration of affluence and envy. Like all the best beach reads, it eats the rich like so many frozen grapes."
Bloomberg Businessweek

Relationships are awful. They'll kill you, right up to the point where they start saving your life.

Paul and Alice’s half-sister Eloise is getting married! In London! There will be fancy hotels, dinners at “it” restaurants and a reception at a country estate complete with tea lights and embroidered cloth napkins.

They couldn’t hate it more.

The People We Hate at the Wedding is the story of a less than perfect family. Donna, the clan’s mother, is now a widow living in the Chicago suburbs with a penchant for the occasional joint and more than one glass of wine with her best friend while watching House Hunters International. Alice is in her thirties, single, smart, beautiful, stuck in a dead-end job where she is mired in a rather predictable, though enjoyable, affair with her married boss. Her brother Paul lives in Philadelphia with his older, handsomer, tenured track professor boyfriend who’s recently been saying things like “monogamy is an oppressive heteronormative construct,” while eyeing undergrads. And then there’s Eloise. Perfect, gorgeous, cultured Eloise. The product of Donna’s first marriage to a dashing Frenchman, Eloise has spent her school years at the best private boarding schools, her winter holidays in St. John and a post-college life cushioned by a fat, endless trust fund. To top it off, she’s infuriatingly kind and decent.

As this estranged clan gathers together, and Eloise's walk down the aisle approaches, Grant Ginder brings to vivid, hilarious life the power of family, and the complicated ways we hate the ones we love the most in the most bitingly funny, slyly witty and surprisingly tender novel you’ll read this year.



Baker
& Taylor

A fractured family from the Chicago suburbs reluctantly gathers in London to attend the eldest daughter's wedding to an upper-crust Englishman, an affair that exposes secrets, triggers riotous culture clashes, and tests the bonds of both families.
"Relationships are awful. They'll kill you, right up to the point where they start saving your life. Paul and Alice's half-sister Eloise is getting married! In London! There will be fancy hotels, dinners at "it" restaurants and a reception at a country estate complete with tea lights and embroidered cloth napkins. They couldn't hate it more. The People We Hate at the Wedding is the story of a less than perfect family. Donna, the clan's mother, is now a widow living in the Chicago suburbs with a penchant for the occasional joint and more than one glass of wine with her best friend while watching House Hunters International. Alice is in her thirties, single, smart, beautiful, stuck in a dead-end job where she is mired in a rather predictable, though enjoyable, affair with her married boss. Her brother Paul lives in Philadelphia with his older, handsomer, tenured track professor boyfriend who's recently been saying things like "monogamy is an oppressive heteronormative construct," while eyeing undergrads. And then there's Eloise. Perfect, gorgeous, cultured Eloise. The product of Donna's first marriage to a dashing Frenchman, Eloise has spent her school years at the best private boarding schools, her winter holidays in St. John and a post-college life cushioned by a fat, endless trust fund. To top it off, she's infuriatingly kind and decent. As this estranged clan gathers together, and Eloise's walk down the aisle approaches, Grant Ginder brings to vivid, hilarious life the power of family, and the complicated ways we hate the ones we love the most in the most bitingly funny, slyly witty and surprisingly tender novel you'll read this year"--

Publisher: New York : Flatiron Books, 2017
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9781250095206
Branch Call Number: FIC GIN
Characteristics: 326 p. ;,25 cm.

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keespinosa
Dec 01, 2017

I really enjoyed this book. I most liked how well the novel demonstrates how we project own insecurities and fears upon others, and often get it so very wrong, with unfortunate, even tragic, results. This, for me, was the message of the book, told well with humor. Characters were self-centered, yes, but that was part of the humor, and I did find myself liking them as fallible humans. Maybe I'm cynical, but I don't think the characters were all that unrealistic. It's just that in real life we hide things very well, often even from ourselves.

d
Dandmmiller
Aug 30, 2017

Agree with the other posters - the characters are self centered and unlikable. It wasn't entertaining to read, and I ended up skimming about 3/4 of it just to be done.

m
maggiepcurtis
Jul 24, 2017

I agree with the other comments. The book grabbed me at first. But as the story progresses and you get to know the characters, you realize that they are all self centered. I cared about none of these shallow people. The only reason I finished was to see if there was any salvation at the end. At least it was a relatively quick read.

g
georgie104
Jul 19, 2017

I have to say this book for me was a dud. No plot, no redeeming characters. Why did I blow a free hold on this?

lindab2662 Jul 01, 2017

I usually won't pick up a book like this. Reading about snarky characters gets old, fast. But I found these characters more 3- dimensional and quirky. Yes they have some over the top situations and family issues. Whose family doesn't? Does everything get wrapped up in a neat and tidy way? No. They realize that family is family, craziness and all. And well done with the writing. The author keeps the story moving along. I couldn't wait to see what finally happened at the wedding.

s
snowball9876
Jun 22, 2017

This was an agonizing read, about a very disfunctional, sick, sad family. Not humorous like I thought it would be.

f
feralranger
Jun 17, 2017

I've had the experience of watching a movie that cost thousands maybe millions of dollars to make and thought to myself after watching it "Why was this made"? That is how I felt about this book. Thankfully I borrowed it free from the Library!
I thought the writing was okay and it had some funny stuff but overall I didn't think it was original. Dysfunctional family fiction abounds and the characters in this family did not appeal to me. I like it when I can connect with at least one character, feel for them, worry about them and hope the best for them. That did not happen here. The second half of the book was slightly more interesting.

It is an interesting topic for a book discussion and if this book generates that kind of discussion then maybe I would give it points for that otherwise I'm going to say keep your distance!

t
tracycookie
Jun 16, 2017

Never could connect with the characters. Writing style dry. Not worth finishing.

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