Israel

Israel

Is It Good for the Jews?

Book - 2014
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Baker & Taylor
"A very personal journey through Jewish history (and Cohen's own), and a passionate defense of Israel's legitimacy. Richard Cohen's book is part reportage, part memoir--an intimate journey through the history of Europe's Jews, culminating in the establishment of Israel. A veteran, syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, Cohen began this journey as a skeptic, wondering in a national column whether the creation of a Jewish State was "a mistake." As he recounts, he delved into his own and Jewish history and fell in love with the story of the Jews and Israel, a twice-promised land--in the Bible by God, and by the world to the remnants of Europe's Jews. This promise, he writes, was made in atonement not just for the Holocaust, but for the callous indifference that preceded World War II and followed it--and that still threatens. Cohen's account is full of stories--from the nineteenth century figures who imagined a Zionist country, including Theodore Herzl, who thought it might resemble Vienna with its cafes and music; to what happened in twentieth century Poland to his own relatives; and to stories of his American boyhood. Cohen describes his relationship with Israel as a sort of marriage: one does not always get along but one is faithful"--

Blackwell Publishing
A veteran syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, Richard Cohen began this journey as a skeptic, wondering in a national column whether the creation of a Jewish state was "a mistake." It drew quite a reaction.

As he recounts, Cohen delved into his own past and Jewish history, and in an exhilarating experience, he writes, he fell in love with the story of the Jews and Israel, the twice-promised land-in the Bible by God, and by the world to the remnants of Europe's Jews. This promise, he writes, was made in atonement: not just for the Holocaust, but for the callous indifference that preceded World War II and followed it-and still threatens.

Israel: Is It Good for the Jews? is full of stories of people-from the nineteenth-century figures who imagined a Zionist country, including Theodor Herzl, who thought it might resemble Vienna with its cafTs and music; to Cohen's own relatives in Nazi-occupied Poland. He goes back to that Polish village and to the Middle East and to scenes from his boyhood.

Cohen describes his relationship with Israel as a sort of marriage: one does not always agree or get along, but one is faithful. Israel: Is It Good for the Jews? is a love story nonetheless.

Baker
& Taylor

Part reportage, part memoir, a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post since 1976 takes readers on a intimate journey through the history of Europe's Jews, while delving into his own Jewish history and sharing stories of his own relatives and his American boyhood. 60,000 first printing.
Presents a narrative journey through the history of Europe's Jews, while delving into the author's own Jewish history, sharing stories of his relatives and his American boyhood and offering a defense of Israel's legitimacy.

Simon and Schuster
A very personal journey through Jewish history (and Cohen’s own), and a passionate defense of Israel’s legitimacy.

Richard Cohen’s book is part reportage, part memoir—an intimate journey through the history of Europe’s Jews, culminating in the establishment of Israel. A veteran, syndicated columnist forThe Washington Post, Cohen began this journey as a skeptic, wondering in a national column whether the creation of a Jewish State was “a mistake.”

As he recounts, he delved into his own and Jewish history and fell in love with the story of the Jews and Israel, a twice-promised land—in the Bible by God, and by the world to the remnants of Europe’s Jews. This promise, he writes, was made in atonement not just for the Holocaust, but for the callous indifference that preceded World War II and followed it—and that still threatens.

Cohen’s account is full of stories—from the nineteenth century figures who imagined a Zionist country, including Theodore Herzl, who thought it might resemble Vienna with its cafes and music; to what happened in twentieth century Poland to his own relatives; and to stories of his American boyhood.

Cohen describes his relationship with Israel as a sort of marriage: one does not always get along but one is faithful.

Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, c2014
ISBN: 9781416575689
Branch Call Number: 956.9405 COH
Characteristics: viii, 275 p. ;,25 cm.

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