Loving Someone Who Has Dementia

Loving Someone Who Has Dementia

How to Find Hope While Coping With Stress and Grief

Book - 2011
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WILEY
Research-based advice for people who care for someone with dementia

Nearly half of U.S. citizens over the age of 85 are suffering from some kind of dementia and require care. Loving Someone Who Has Dementia is a new kind of caregiving book. It's not about the usual techniques, but about how to manage on-going stress and grief. The book is for caregivers, family members, friends, neighbors as well as educators and professionals—anyone touched by the epidemic of dementia. Dr. Boss helps caregivers find hope in "ambiguous loss"—having a loved one both here and not here, physically present but psychologically absent.

  • Outlines seven guidelines to stay resilient while caring for someone who has dementia
  • Discusses the meaning of relationships with individuals who are cognitively impaired and no longer as they used to be
  • Offers approaches to understand and cope with the emotional strain of care-giving

Boss's book builds on research and clinical experience, yet the material is presented as a conversation. She shows you a way to embrace rather than resist the ambiguity in your relationship with someone who has dementia.



Baker & Taylor
"Research-based advice for people who care for someone with dementia. Nearly half of U.S. citizens over the age of 85 are suffering from some kind of dementia and require care. When Someone You Love Has Dementia is a new kind of caregiving book. It's not about the usual techniques, but about how to manage on-going stress and grief. The book is for caregivers, family members, friends, neighbors as well as educators and professionals, anyone touched by the epidemic of dementia. Dr. Boss helps caregivers find hope in "ambiguous loss" having a loved one both here and not here, physically present but psychologically absent. Outlines seven guidelines to stay resilient while caring for someone who has dementia. Discusses the meaning of relationships with individuals who are cognitively impaired and no longer as they used to be. Offers approaches to understand and cope with the emotional strain of care-giving. Boss's book builds on research and clinical experience, yet the material is presented as a conversation. She shows you a way to embrace rather than resist the ambiguity in your relationship with someone who has dementia"--

Book News
Emeritus professor Boss (U. of Minnesota) is best known for her groundbreaking research on stress reduction for people with "ambiguously lost"--physically present but psychologically absent--loved ones. She presents an accessible text for anyone caring for or about a person with illness-related dementia, to help readers increase their ability to withstand and grow even stronger despite the stress and grief of the situation. Designed to be read alone or with a group, the text explains the concept of the ambiguous loss of dementia; loss and grief; identifying personal stress issues to begin coping; learning to embrace the ambiguity; having a "psychological family" for comfort and support; maintaining other human connections; guidelines for caring for oneself as the caregiver; and the positive side of ambiguity. Jossey-Bass is an imprint of Wiley. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

"Research-based advice for people who care for someone with dementia. Nearly half of U.S. citizens over the age of 85 are suffering from some kind of dementia and require care. When Someone You Love Has Dementia is a new kind of caregiving book. It's notabout the usual techniques, but about how to manage on-going stress and grief. The book is for caregivers, family members, friends, neighbors as well as educators and professionals, anyone touched by the epidemic of dementia. Dr. Boss helps caregivers find hope in "ambiguous loss" having a loved one both here and not here, physically present but psychologically absent. Outlines seven guidelines to stay resilient while caring for someone who has dementia. Discusses the meaning of relationships with individuals who are cognitively impaired and no longer as they used to be. Offers approaches to understand and cope with the emotional strain of care-giving. Boss's book builds on research and clinical experience, yet the material is presented as a conversation. She shows you a way to embrace rather than resist the ambiguity in your relationship with someone who has dementia"--Provided by publisher.
Provides guidelines for managing the stress and grief of knowing someone who is suffering from dementia, including how to stay resilient and cope with the emotional strains of caregiving and the meaning of relationships with those who are cognitively impaired.
Provides guidelines for managing the stress and grief of knowing someone who is suffering from dementia, including how to stay resilient and cope with the emotional strains of caregiving and the meaning of relationships with those who are cognitively impaired. Original.

Publisher: San Fransisco : Jossey-Bass, c2011
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9781118002292
Branch Call Number: 616.83 BOS
Characteristics: xxiv, 232 p. ;,23 cm.

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dbroten
Jan 21, 2015

This book offers comfort, solace, and practical exercises. Beautifully done in small segments.

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