Somebody Else's Money

Somebody Else's Money

The Walrond Ranch Story, 1883-1907

Book - 2009
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The Walrond Ranch, a cattle and horse operation in the foothills of southern Alberta, was one of the four giants of the livestock grazing industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. At its height, the Walrond ran over 10,000 cattle along with several hundred well-bred Clydesdale and Shire horses on nearly 300,000 acres of land.
     Ultimately, however, the Walrond failed. The driving force behind the ranch, Dr. Duncan McNab McEachran, had high aspirations and communicated his optimism to Sir John Walrond and the rest of the British investors funding the venture. But reality quickly set in. Winter storms, drought, disease, and predators constantly depleted the Walrond&;s herds and the operation inexorably slipped toward bankruptcy. McEachran&;s poor management played just as large a role as the environmental challenges in the ranch&;s downfall; his stubborn reluctance to admit failure prolonged the inevitable, wasting more and more investor dollars in the meantime.
     Somebody Else&;s Money is the first close environmental and economic study of one of the so-called &;great&; ranches on the northern Great Plains of North America. Author Warren Elofson examines the business side of large-scale, open range grazing and describes the myriad of natural and man-made obstacles that barred it from success. He argues that, financially, the Walrond was doomed from the beginning because its management approach and grazing practices were unsuited to both the natural and economic conditions of the frontier environment.

The Walrond Ranch, a cattle and horse operation in the foothills of southern Alberta, was one of the four giants of the livestock grazing industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. At its height, the Walrond ran over 10,000 cattle along with several hundred well-bred Clydesdale and Shire horses on nearly 300,000 acres of land. Ultimately, however, the Walrond failed. The driving force behind the ranch, Dr. Duncan McNab McEachran, had high aspirations and communicated his optimism to Sir John Walrond and the rest of the British investors funding the venture. But reality quickly set in. Winter storms, drought, disease, and predators constantly depleted the Walrond’s herds and the operation inexorably slipped toward bankruptcy. McEachran’s poor management played just as large a role as the environmental challenges in the ranch’s downfall; his stubborn reluctance to admit failure prolonged the inevitable, wasting more and more investor dollars in the meantime. Somebody Else’s Money is the first close environmental and economic study of one of the so-called ?great” ranches on the northern Great Plains of North America. Author Warren Elofson examines the business side of large-scale, open range grazing and describes the myriad of natural and man-made obstacles that barred it from success. He argues that, financially, the Walrond was doomed from the beginning because its management approach and grazing practices were unsuited to both the natural and economic conditions of the frontier environment.


Book News
Author Elofson (history, U. of Calgary) provides an environmental and economic study of one of the four huge ranches on the northern Great Plains in southern Alberta. The Walrond Ranch, at its peak, had more than 10,000 head of cattle and hundreds more of horses on 300,000 acres of land. The managing director for the ranch had high hopes for its success, and its investors had equally high hopes for a quick and easy return on their investments. But the ranch ultimately failed as a result of storms, drought, disease, predators, and poor management decisions. The book explores the business side of big open range grazing and the obstacles that thwarted it. Distributed by Michigan State U. Press. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Blackwell Publishing
The Walrond Ranch, a cattle and horse operation in the foothills of southern Alberta, was one of the four giants of the livestock grazing industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. At its height, the Walrond ran over 10,000 cattle along with several hundred well-bred Clydesdale and Shire horses on nearly 300,000 acres of land. Ultimately, however, the Walrond failed. The driving force behind the ranch, Dr. Duncan McNab McEachran, had high aspirations and communicated his optimism to Sir John Walrond and the rest of the British investors funding the venture. But reality quickly set in. Winter storms, drought, disease, and predators constantly depleted the Walrond's herds and the operation inexorably slipped toward bankruptcy. McEachran's poor management played just as large a role as the environmental challenges in the ranch's downfall; his stubborn reluctance to admit failure prolonged the inevitable, wasting more and more investor dollars in the meantime.Somebody Else's Money: The Walrond Ranch Story, 1883 1907, is the first close environmental and economic study of one of the so-called "great" ranches on the northern Great Plains of North America. Warren Elofson examines the business side of large-scale, open range grazing and describes the myriad of natural and man-made obstacles that barred it from success. He argues that, financially, the Walrond was doomed from the beginning because its management approach and grazing practices were unsuited to both the natural and economic conditions of the frontier environment.

Publisher: Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2009
ISBN: 9781552382578
Branch Call Number: 971.23402 ELO
Characteristics: v, 285 p. :,ill., map ;,23 cm.

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