The Animal Connection

The Animal Connection

A New Perspective on What Makes Us Human

Book - 2011
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WW Norton
The Animal Connection

Baker & Taylor
Describes how humans' relationships with other animals, and our propensity to domesticate and care for them over the last 2.6 million years, has helped the species reach the milestones of civilization from agriculture to art and even language. 17,000 first printing.

Norton Pub
A bold, illuminating new take on the love of animals that drove human evolution.
Why do humans all over the world take in and nurture other animals? This behavior might seem maladaptive—after all, every mouthful given to another species is one that you cannot eat—but in this heartening new study, acclaimed anthropologist Pat Shipman reveals that our propensity to domesticate and care for other animals is in fact among our species' greatest strengths. For the last 2.6 million years, Shipman explains, humans who coexisted with animals enjoyed definite adaptive and cultural advantages. To illustrate this point, Shipman gives us a tour of the milestones in human civilization-from agriculture to art and even language—and describes how we reached each stage through our unique relationship with other animals. The Animal Connection reaffirms our love of animals as something both innate and distinctly human, revealing that the process of domestication not only changed animals but had a resounding impact on us as well.

Book News
Living with animals is a uniquely human trait; in the wild, no other mammal lives intimately with another species or initiates long-term relationships with individuals of another species. Shipman (anthropology, Pennsylvania State U.) reflects on the significance of this fact within the context of human evolution, offering a paleoanthropological perspective. She charts the stages of human evolution through 2.6 million years and looks at the impact of the animal-human connection and the domestication of other species at each stage. The book is written in plain language accessible to non-specialists, and is illustrated with b&w photos of artifacts. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Describes how humans' relationships with other animals, and the propensity to domesticate them over the last 2.6 million years, has helped the species reach the milestones of civilization from agriculture to art and language.
Why do humans all over the world take in and nurture other animals? This behavior might seem maladaptive--after all, every mouthful given to another species is one that you cannot eat--but in this heartening new study, acclaimed anthropologist Pat Shipman reveals that our propensity to domesticate and care for other animals is in fact among our species' greatest strengths. For the last 2.6 million years, Shipman explains, humans who coexisted with animals enjoyed definite adaptive and cultural advantages. To illustrate this point, Shipman gives us a tour of the milestones in human civilization--from agriculture to art and even language--and describes how we reached each stage through our unique relationship with other animals. The Animal Connection reaffirms our love of animals as something both innate and distinctly human, revealing that the process of domestication not only changed animals but had a resounding impact on us as well.--From publisher description.

Publisher: New York : Norton, c2011
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780393070545
Branch Call Number: 304.27 SHI
Characteristics: 336 p. :,ill. ;,22 cm.

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Tater
Feb 09, 2012

This is an overrated and disappointing book. The author contends that she has developed a "new perspective on what makes us human," going so far as to claim a novel scientific hypothesis. Simply stated, it is as though she never heard of Paul Shepard, ecopsychology, or the deep ecology movement. Either that, or academic barriers prevented her from acknowledging or validating these others. This is a shame. Shepard's work in particular reaches out and fully eclipses the author's comparitively paltry contribution.

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