Bird Coloration

Bird Coloration

Book - 2010
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Random House, Inc.
Why is a cardinal red or a bluebird blue? Why do some birds have plumage that is intensely colored—is it pigment, light, gender, robust health, or some combination of all four? What roles do disease, climate, and wear and tear play in this process? What does feather display signal about sexual attraction and social status? How has color camouflage evolved?

These are just a few of the fascinating questions explored here in the first non-academic work on coloration and plumage, and their key role in avian life. More than 200 gorgeous photographs highlight the explanations of the essentials: what color is, ornithologically speaking; how it is produced and measured; how birds use color to attract mates and deter competitors; how birds perceive color; and how coloration varies across species by sex, season, and age.

Geoff Hill guides his readers along an engaging but authoritative narrative illustrated with vivid photographs and fact-packed captions. A book conceived in the same spirit as National Geographic’s more traditional bird guides, it’s sure to appeal to serious ornithologists, recreational bird watchers, and natural history buffs alike.

Baker & Taylor
Examines different aspects of bird coloration, discussing such topics as patterns of variation, environmental influences, identity, mate selection, signaling, concealment, and the evolution of color.

Book News
In this lively popular account, ornithologist Hill (Biology, Auburn University) untangles the mysteries of bird plumage and coloration. The first book on the subject to be written for a non-academic audience, it examines the key role of coloration in avian life, explaining what color is; how it is produced and measured; how birds use color to attract mates and deter competitors; how birds perceive color; and how coloration varies across species by sex, season, and age. Although aimed at birders and natural history buffs, this authoritative book has much to offer to serious ornithologists as well. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Seventeen short chapters with engaging narrative and lots of photos with information-packed captions illustrate the mechanisms by which birds produce the characteristic and sometimes brilliant coloration of their feathers and other body parts.
From the raven's sheen of midnight-black plumage to the iridescent brilliance of hummingbirds, a unique book that includes 225 color photos explores both the spectacle and the science of bird coloration--a mystery that has fascinated people through the ages.

Publisher: Washington, D.C. : National Geographic, c2010
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9781426205712
Branch Call Number: 598.1472 HIL
Characteristics: 255 p. :,col. ill. ;,26 cm.
Additional Contributors: National Geographic Society (U.S.)

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22950009541673
Aug 02, 2010

A great book, where it deals with facts. I found it fascinating that with 4 types of cones in their eyes, birds are able to see in ultraviolet. However, they should have left the unproven theories alone.

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