Point Omega

Point Omega

A Novel

Book - 2010
Average Rating:
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Baker & Taylor
Jim Finley, a young filmmaker, attempts to convince Richard Elster, a former secret war advisor, to tell his story on film, an endeavor complicated by the arrival of Richard's daughter from New York and a devastating event that throws everything into question.

Baker
& Taylor

Jim Finley, a young filmmaker, attempts to convince Richard Elster, a former secret war advisor, to tell his story on film, an endeavor complicated by the arrival of Richard's daughter, Jessie, from New York and a devastating event that throws everything into question. By the National Book Award-winning author of White Noise.

Simon and Schuster
Writing about conspiracy theory in Libra , government cover-ups in White Noise , the Cold War in Underworld , and 9/11 in Falling Man , “DeLillo’s books have been weirdly prophetic about twenty-first century America” ( The New York Times Book Review ). Now, in Point Omega , he takes on the secret strategists in America’s war machine. .

In the middle of a desert “somewhere south of nowhere,” to a forlorn house made of metal and clapboard, a secret war advisor has gone in search of space and time. Richard Elster, seventy-three, was a scholar—an outsider—when he was called to a meeting with government war planners. They asked Elster to conceptualize their efforts—to form an intellectual framework for their troop deployments, counterinsurgency, orders for rendition. For two years he read their classified documents and attended secret meetings. He was to map the reality these men were trying to create. “Bulk and swagger,” he called it. .

At the end of his service, Elster retreats to the desert, where he is joined by a filmmaker intent on documenting his experience. Jim Finley wants to make a one-take film, Elster its single character—“Just a man against a wall.” .

The two men sit on the deck, drinking and talking. Finley makes the case for his film. Weeks go by. And then Elster’s daughter Jessie visits—an “otherworldly” woman from New York—who dramatically alters the dynamic of the story. When a devastating event follows, all the men’s talk, the accumulated meaning of conversation and connection, is thrown into question. What is left is loss, fierce and incomprehensible..

Publisher: New York : Scribner, c2010
Edition: 1st Scribner hardcover ed
ISBN: 9781439169957
Branch Call Number: FIC DEL
Characteristics: 117 p. ;,23 cm.

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josie3706
Jun 15, 2013

have been meaning to read this well-regarded author for some time and picked this as short. Thought it would be a look at the Iraq war from an advisor's standpoint but it was more obtuse than that. Lots of philosophy and film references-it is bracketed beginning and end by a 24-hour video installation of Pyscho. Frankly, I didn't get it

b
Brian_Shaw
Mar 04, 2011

There is very little character development for the four characters in the book. It felt like overhearing a conversation on a train, just enough to be mildly interesting, but not enough to understand what is going on.

sliston Oct 01, 2010

DeLillo convincingly gets us into the minds of the characters, but... nothing happens. And getting to our final destination of nowhere isn't any fun either. So what's the point?

What was fantastic -- and almost makes the short book worth reading -- was the semi disconnected intro and epilogue which describes in detail the effect of Douglas Gordon's _24 Hour Psycho_ installation on one man's psyche.

If you're a fan of video art (or long to live a life in desert exile) it's worth reading. Otherwise... meh.

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