Borrowed Rooms

Borrowed Rooms

Book - 2008
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These poems, spare and nuanced, explore the borrowed rooms we inhabit in personal relationships: the temporary homes of marriage and parenting; the personas we carry for a little while and must ultimately abandon. In tight and unsentimental poems, Barbara Pelman grieves the death of a father, notes the changing dynamics of mothers and daughters, watches the doors irrevocably close on a marriage, and delights in the temporal beauty surrounding her: the simple splendour of garry oak and hawthorn, arbutus branches bent to the shape of wind, and the stutter of shoreline. The idea of a borrowed room finds expression in Pelman's deft use of form: she writes sonnets, sestinas, ghazals and glosas borrowed from ancient Persia and Renaissance Italy that surprise us with their intensity and tactile clarity. The image of a borrowed room has other implications: from the window of the unfamiliar, her perspective on the familiar changes ? her poems glimpse a Zen garden of star magnolia and early daffodil, islands drifting in a new sea, the rain shining the bones of trees on the beach ? a sense, finally, of home. As she tells us in the final poem, “you do not know where you are until you are there, and even then, only time seems to have moved.”



Blackwell North Amer
These poems, spare and nuanced, explore the borrowed rooms we inhabit in personal relationships: the temporary homes of marriage and parenting; the personas we carry for a little while and must ultimately abandon. In tight and unsentimental poems, Barbara Pelman grieves the death of a father, notes the changing dynamics of mothers and daughters, watches the doors irrevocably close on a marriage, and delights in the temporal beauty surrounding her: the simple splendour of garry oak and hawthorn, arbutus branches bent to the shape of wind, and the stutter of shoreline. The idea of a borrowed room finds expression in Pelman's deft use of form: she writes sonnets, sestinas, ghazals and glosas borrowed from ancient Persia and Renaissance Italy that surprise us with their intensity and tactile clarity. The image of a borrowed room has other implications: from the window of the unfamiliar, her perspective on the familiar changes - her poems glimpse a Zen garden of star magnolia and early daffodil, islands drifting in a new sea, the rain shining the bones of trees on the beach - a sense, finally, of home. As she tells us in the final poem, "you do not know where you are until you are there, and even then, only time seems to have moved."

Publisher: Vancouver : Ronsdale Press, 2008
ISBN: 9781553800613
1553800613
Branch Call Number: 811.6 PEL
Characteristics: 135 p. ;,23 cm.

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