The Speed of Dark

The Speed of Dark

Large Print - 2003
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Baker & Taylor
Journeys inside the mind of Lou Arrendale, an autistic man, who is asked to undergo a new, experimental treatment designed to cure autism, as he decides whether or not he should risk a medical procedure that could make him "normal."

Publisher: Waterville, Me. : Thorndike Press, 2003
ISBN: 9780786252145
Branch Call Number: LP FIC MOO
Characteristics: 523 p. ;,24 cm.


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Mar 23, 2017

I really liked the first 3/4 of the book. Decent portrayal of an autist mind, interesting pattern overlays and took the time to have focus not just on interpersonal interactions. The ending... took the easy way out while also throwing away the original character. I'm still reeling from the ending, and feeling like the author's point is that autists are better off not existing at all. Which is just utterly revolting to me.

JCLLisaJ Apr 11, 2013

Set in the near future where it is possible to cure autism, Moon, the author and parent of a child with autism addresses the question “what is normal?” What happens to those who aren’t “normal”? The Speed of Dark is a powerful and thought provoking book which raises a lot of questions and provides insight into society and how we treat those who don’t meet society’s definition of “normal” and this future world’s solution. This is one of my favorites, but as a parent of a child with autism I have horribly mixed feelings about the ending and the main character’s choice.

While some may find it slow, it is written from the main character's point of view which provides great insight into how someone with autism may think and feel. Stick with it... you won't be sorry!

Apr 24, 2012

This is one of the best books I have ever read. There are other worlds out there and people live in them.

Oct 19, 2011

I found Moon's 'The Speed of Dark' to be a slow read. The premise centres on an experimental autism cure in the near future and whether the main character, Lou, a high functioning autistic man, should undergo the treatment. Unfortunately, Moon tries to create a first person point-of-view of Lou with a 'dialect' that is supposed to get inside the head of Lou and his speach patterns. This 'dialect' is repeatitious. It was often slow going which was not helped by a weak plot. The novel was OK.

Sep 22, 2011

Excellent! Engrossing.

Aug 06, 2011

Wonderful insights in the world of autism. Gives the reader much to ponder regarding their relationships with people with disabilities.

Celiza Apr 23, 2011

This book is an incredible depiction of what it is like to live as a person with autism. It is well-written, an entertaining read, and addresses the important question of whether a person would be the same person with and without a cognitive disability -- how does having such a disability contribute to who a person is. This is an amazing book.

Aug 24, 2010

This is one of the best books I have ever read. . . .a great novel that provides an accurate picture of what life is like for an autistic person.

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